Pretty Painted Invitations and Ways To Personalize Them

An invitation to paint

I love painting, I think it's a great way to destress and decompress.  I've also found it's when my daughter, who is pretty quiet, will tell me things about her day that she otherwise would keep to herself.  Give her a paintbrush and a canvas and suddenly her mouth opens and she'll tell me all kinds of things that have been bothering her, or her dreams for the future that she's been hiding away.  Is there someone in your life that you are trying to get to know better?  Try having an art session with them and see if they open up to you!

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I see your red door, I want it painted black
No colors any more, I want them to turn black
— Mick Jagger & Keith Richards

Why Painted Invites?

I'm a creative person, and as such I consider everything to be a "first draft".  These $6 turquoise shoes from Walmart?  First draft - they look so much more interesting when I used my craft stencil and white acrylic paint to embellish them while my son was in toddler soccer.  Good will t-shirt?  First draft - iron on ribbon from Michaels totally hid that tiny mark and updated the overall look.  And yet, it took me forever to put two and two together.  Coming up with a line of event stationery based on my original fine art was more of a sixth draft idea.

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Draft six.

Better late than never.

Sometimes good things take time.  I'm happier with this line of invitations than anything I've done before.  Each one feels like an actual piece of art that I'm creating, because that's how it starts - just me, some yupo paper, and some of my favorite alcohol inks, getting messy and watching things flow and take on a life of their own, under my direction.

While I create the art, there are ways my clients personalize the invitation to suit their event, and I love that.  No two invitations ever really end up looking the same.  Here are some ways we have changed the an invitation to personalize it for a client:

  • change the font.  This is probably the easiest change to make and creates the biggest impact.  You can go from old school romantic to trendy hipster in one move.
  • put in your own text.  I don't mean, just switch out the names... I mean, write your invitation so that it sounds like you.  If your catch phrase is, "see you on the flippity", then play with your RSVP text so your reply choices reflect that phrase.  (And maybe consider updating your vocabulary, lol!)
  • include your language(s).  I'm from Toronto, and am used to working with couples from a variety of backgrounds.  Sometimes an invitation needs to be in English and French, sometimes in English and Portugese, sometimes a few need to be in English, Serbian and Dutch (ok, that was me).  I think it's cool to see a couple's unique heritage reflected in an invitation.
 My Grey Frost invitation was created using the acrylic fluid pour method.  Seriously fun and seriously messy.  My kitchen table - ahem, my art studio, excuse me - has never been quite the same.  

My Grey Frost invitation was created using the acrylic fluid pour method.  Seriously fun and seriously messy.  My kitchen table - ahem, my art studio, excuse me - has never been quite the same.  

I hope this gives you some ideas when it comes to invitations and ways to make them a little bit more your own.  Every event - wedding, anniversary, birthday - deserves to be recognized as the unique experience it is, and that starts with the invitation!

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How to add color to a room without breaking your budget.

Do you find that your home needs a pop of color, but the thought of repainting your walls makes you want to stick forks in your eyes?  I hear you.  Luckily, there's a relatively easy way to jazz up your space without killing yourself physically, or breaking yourself financially.

Pick your accent color

Take a look at your space, and choose a color that you would like to play up with your accessories.  Different color choices will provide a different feel in your space.

 The color wheel is a great reference point if you feel color choices don't come to you instinctually.  Neutral beige toned walls would be somewhere on the left where the oranges start to move into the yellows, if that helps.

The color wheel is a great reference point if you feel color choices don't come to you instinctually.  Neutral beige toned walls would be somewhere on the left where the oranges start to move into the yellows, if that helps.

To make colors "pop" against your wall, choose something on the opposite side of the color wheel.  For accessories that blend in a bit more rather than stand out against the wall, choose something closer in range on the wheel.

What to buy?

You don't need to buy lots of items, or expensive items, to make a big impact.  Once you've chosen a color (or two) to play up, look for sales and see what you can find.  Here are some ideas for a living room:

  • throw pillows
  • art prints
  • vase/flowers
  • picture frames
  • ceramic decorative items

This is what I did with my fireplace, as an example.  I decided to keep it pretty simple and used blue and white as my accent colors.

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I painted the artwork and used the blue from the piece as the color inspiration for the pillows, and to balance the "weight" of the art piece by bringing your eye down with color and pattern in the pillows below.  The white in the ceramic owls, candles and vase tie everything together (including the pillows).

The most expensive piece (besides the cost of framing the canvas - which I think is unique to artists, lol!) was the pillows at $24.99 each.  By purchasing during sales and knowing ahead of time what color palette I was looking for, I was able to zone in on the items I wanted.

For unique art prints at affordable prices, please check out our store.  Our prints are available in different sizes to accommodate a variety of spaces.

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